Book Review: Candide by Voltaire

François-Marie Arouet, known by his pen name Voltaire, was a French writer and philosopher in the Enlightenment period of 1685 – 1815. He often wrote satirical novels and plays that criticized contemporary social institutions and religious intolerance. His signature work Candide, or Optimism, follows the story of a naïve young man that experiences a series… Continue reading Book Review: Candide by Voltaire

Book Review: Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

This was my first Dostoevsky ever! I adore his writing and laughed out loud several times (“haha I do that!”). Darkly funny, strangely introspective and painfully relatable. As bitter and pathetic as the underground man undeniably is, it’s startling how many similarities we share (which honestly is now making me question whether that means I’m bitter and pathetic... hm)… Continue reading Book Review: Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Book Review: The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays by Albert Camus

“There is but one truly serious philosophical problem and that is suicide. Judging whether life is or is not worth living amounts to answering the fundamental questions of philosophy.”I think that to most healthy individuals, the notion of resorting to suicide can be inconceivable. Humans are biological organisms like any other: evolutionarily geared towards survival,… Continue reading Book Review: The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays by Albert Camus

Book Review: Wuthering Heights by Emily Brönte

(Possibly my favourite book... ever written.) "You teach me now how cruel you've been - cruel and false. Why did you despise me? Why did you betray your own heart, Cathy? I have not one word of comfort. You deserve this. You have killed yourself. Yes, you may kiss me, and cry; and wring out… Continue reading Book Review: Wuthering Heights by Emily Brönte