Book Review: Candide by Voltaire

François-Marie Arouet, known by his pen name Voltaire, was a French writer and philosopher in the Enlightenment period of 1685 – 1815. He often wrote satirical novels and plays that criticized contemporary social institutions and religious intolerance. His signature work Candide, or Optimism, follows the story of a naïve young man that experiences a series… Continue reading Book Review: Candide by Voltaire

Book Review: The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays by Albert Camus

“There is but one truly serious philosophical problem and that is suicide. Judging whether life is or is not worth living amounts to answering the fundamental questions of philosophy.”I think that to most healthy individuals, the notion of resorting to suicide can be inconceivable. Humans are biological organisms like any other: evolutionarily geared towards survival,… Continue reading Book Review: The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays by Albert Camus

Book Review: A Vindication of the Rights of Women by Mary Wollstonecraft

"Strengthen the female mind by enlarging it, and there will be an end to blind obedience." Feminism is always a complicated topic to write about, because I've seen its focal elements vary by the contexts they're applied to. In the West, the third wave of feminism tends to focus a lot on body politics, sexual… Continue reading Book Review: A Vindication of the Rights of Women by Mary Wollstonecraft

Review: We Have Always Lived In The Castle by Shirley Jackson

We Have Always Lived In The Castle is an ode to isolation. Shirley Jackson's last work, written during the years of her life in which she succumbed deeper into the throes of paranoia and agoraphobia, feels like a deeply personal novel, with many themes being shared between her own struggles and that of the women in her book.